Archive for March, 2015

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I Did It!

31 March 2015

Each year I try to post every day in March.  And I managed to do it despite the fact that very little interesting has happened round here in the last month. 

I work a bit, I unpack boxes a bit (just moved house), I knit a bit. 

But I’ve sorely neglected my blog for the last 12 months so I’m hoping this will kick-start me into action.  I’ve been posting here for 8 years and I don’t want to stop any time soon.

It’s fun and I’ve made real-life friends here.  And it gives me the opportunity to have a rant and you know how much I love that.

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A Win For Everyone … and for Decency

30 March 2015

I came across an interesting statistic a few days ago. 

The Australian Government spends just over $2 BILLION a year keeping asylum seekers and refugees in detention.  The ones we’ve dumped on Manus Island and Naura are costing us $400,000 a year per person.  And remember we have a population of fewer than 25 million people in this country footing the bill for this.

If we allowed most of these people to live in the community (at a cost to the country of about $20,000 each per annum), the country’s debt problems would be solved. We wouldn’t be talking about increasing university fees, cutting welfare payments, closing down legal advice centres, or increasing medical charges.

We’d have no children behind barbed wire. No babies born “in captivity”.  And we’d have a number of people who are willing and able to make a contribution to this country actually being allowed to do so. 

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Easter Show Pics

29 March 2015

Of course I’ve no great photos of the knitting and crochet from the Easter Show.  I’m lazy and a lousy photographer.

But as usual, Kris has come to the rescue with a wonderful set of pics.  Thanks, Kris.

Enjoy!

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Service Not Included

28 March 2015

We went for our election night dinner tonight at a well-known local restaurant. 

The restaurant boasts a relaxed atmosphere, good food and that they “keep service to a minimum”.

Well, we couldn’t argue with that.  The food was fine but the service wasn’t much in evidence. 

I have to say I’ve never seen a lack of service presented as a selling point before.

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Choices, Choices

27 March 2015

David has just asked if I’d like to go out for dinner tomorrow night. Or would I prefer to stay in front of the television watching the results of the NSW election.

I’ll take the dinner, thank you.

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Praise Or Insult?

26 March 2015

The Hand-knitting and Crochet sections of the Easter Show are divided into a number of classes – Socks, Stranded Knitting, Creative Design, Baby Jackets – but there is one class in both the knitting and crochet section that’s on its own – Entry Restricted to Exhibitor Over 70 years of age. They can enter any type of knitting or crochet in those two classes.

I’ve never understood the rationale for this.  Is it that it’s thought that over the age of 70 knitters and crocheters are too old and doddery to hold a pair of needles and a hook and therefore shouldn’t be asked to compete against those without severe arthritis?  Or is it that it’s thought to be unfair to ask younger knitters and crocheters to compete against those with many more years’ experience?

I can never be sure whether these categories are insulting to the elderly or intended to pick out their honed skills for extra recognition.

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Facts and “Facts”

25 March 2015

I think I’m going to scream!  I keep being told that children who don’t vaccinate their children have given a great deal of thought to this and done a lot of research.  Why should I have any more respect for them just because they’ve proved they can read? And know how to use Google?

I’m sure Tom Cruise did a bit of reading before he became a Scientologist. But I still don’t respect his views on the subject or consider him anything other than crackers. And I certainly don’t believe his views should be considered valid.  (Or that Scientology in this country should receive tax concessions as a church, or have tax-payer funded schools – but that’s for another day).

It isn’t THAT you do the research that matters.  It’s WHERE you do it.